Video Shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel Shaking Uncontrollably In Public For The 2nd Time In A Few Days

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been seen shaking for a third time in a month as she met Finland's visiting Prime Minister in Berlin today.

However, the 64-year-old was quick to assure the public all is well at a joint press conference with Antti Rinne, later in the afternoon.  

Earlier in the day, Merkel could be seen trembling as she stood alongside Rinne, watching the military honours, and listening to the two nations' national anthems to mark the Finnish Prime Minister's arrival. 

As the camera pans, the 64-year-old can be seen clasping her hands momentarily, before she drops them to her side and her entire body appears to shake uncontrollably back and forth.  

July 10: The shaking problem surfaced a third time this week when Merkel trembled while national anthems were being played during a visit by Finland's prime minister

As the camera pans, the 64-year-old can be seen clasping her hands momentarily, before she drops them to her sides, as her body appears to shake uncontrollably 

Addressing the media later in the day, Merkel said she was 'working through' her bouts of shaking that first struck in mid-June, though she insisted she was fine and that 'just as it happened one day, so it will disappear.'. 

'This process is clearly not finished yet but there is progress and I must live with this for a while but I am very well and you don't need to worry about me,' she added.

'I am convinced that I am quite capable (of doing my job).'

Merkel's office has given no explanation for the shaking episodes, prompting speculation in German media about the cause. The chancellor, 64 and in office since 2005, has no history of serious health issues.

The German Chancellor walks down the red carpet with the Finnish Prime Minister in a ceremony in Berlin marking his arrival

The German Chancellor walks down the red carpet with the Finnish Prime Minister in a ceremony in Berlin marking his arrival

Today's episode followed two similar episodes. The latest, prior to today, happened just under two weeks ago, on June 27, when Merkel was seen shaking during a public appearance with the German President. 

Fears were first sparked about her health earlier in the month, on June 18, when Merkel was seen shaking while meeting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy - something she attributed to being dehydrated. 

In the June 27 incident, the 64-year-old Chancellor's arms and body could be seen noticeably trembling as she met President Frank-Walter Steinmeier. 

It came just hours before she was due to board the plane to the G20 summit in Japan, sparking new questions about her health.

At the time, a German government spokesman said Merkel would not cancel any upcoming appointments - saying 'The chancellor is well.' 

Merkel's spokesman Steffen Seibert later tweeted she was on the way to Osaka for the G20 summit, and that 'numerous bilateral talks with other leaders are planned'.    

Chancellor Angela Merkel was seen shaking as she met President Frank-Walter Steinmeier in Berlin on June 27

Chancellor Angela Merkel was seen shaking as she met President Frank-Walter Steinmeier in Berlin on June 27

For around two minutes, she continually folded her arms in an apparent attempt to stop her hands and body from violently juddering. 

WHAT IS CAUSING ANGELA MERKEL TO SHAKE?

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been caught on camera shaking again, for the third time in a month.

In the first episode, on June 18, she blamed dehydration for her trembling as she stood in the sun in Berlin next to Ukraine's new president Volodymyr Zelensky.  

A Merkel spokesperson on June 27 offered no reason for the second incident and claimed she was 'fine' after footage showed her shaking while standing next to president Frank-Walter Steinmeier.

An over-active thyroid? 

Dr Sarah Brewer, a GP and medical director of Healthspan, told MailOnline Merkel's shaking could be caused by having an over-active thyroid.

The condition is 10 times more likely to strike women than men, according to the NHS.

Side effect of medication? 

Dr Brewer added that shaking could be a side effect of some medication. 

The US National Library of Medicine lists 17 different drugs that can cause the shakes, including caffeine, antibiotics, antidepressants, alcohol or nicotine.

Experts are divided over the suspected cause of Angela Merkel's mysterious shakes. One said the jolts were 'not a sign' of Parkinson's, which is often associated with tremors (stock)

Experts are divided over the suspected cause of Angela Merkel's mysterious shakes. One said the jolts were 'not a sign' of Parkinson's, which is often associated with tremors (stock)

Low blood sugar? 

Shaking, which is uncontrollable, can also be a sign of low blood sugar - a serious complication often seen in diabetic patients.

Essential tremor? 

The shakes can also be caused by a fever, fear, stress or a medical condition called essential tremor. 

The neurological disease strikes up to four per cent of people over the age of 40 in the UK, data suggests. It is unclear how common it is in Germany. 

Orthostatic tremor?

After watching the footage of Merkel shaking the first time, Peter Garrard, a professor at St George's, University of London, said her symptoms 'seem to fit with a diagnosis of orthostatic tremor' - a rare neurological condition.

When asked again on June 27, he told MailOnline: 'I still think it’s orthostatic tremor.'

The disorder, previously referred to as Shaky Legs Syndrome - according to orthostatictremor.org, tends to strike people in their sixties. 

Merkel is 64 - she turns 65 next week.

Patients often suffer with tremors in one or more parts of their body, which is often worse when they stand. 

The progressive disorder generally causes 'shaky' or 'frozen' legs, which usually disappear when the patient sits, walks or lies down. 

Stress can make the shakes worse, which then becomes a vicious cycle as tremors cause the patient to become increasingly uneasy. 

Or the tremors, which can last just a few seconds, can come on for no apparent reason. 

Over time, the condition can cause fatigue, pain and immobility. There is no cure but drugs like Clonazepam can ease the symptoms. 

Walking aids like scooters, sticks or even wheelchairs in extreme cases, may eventually be required. 

An infection?

Dr Mike Fitzpatrick, a GP, told The Telegraph the body often shakes when fighting an infection.

This helps to raise the body's temperature to 'kill' an invading bacteria or virus.

'Rigors tend to last a few minutes and then once the heat is generated, you’d be right back to normal,' he said.

However, Dr Philippa Kaye, a London-based GP, told MailOnline that she would hope any infection Merkel may have had 'would have been treated by now'.

What experts say definitely aren't causing Merkel to shake 

Parkinson's - Ley Sander, a professor of neurology at University College London told MailOnline the shakes Mrs Merkel had was definitely 'not a sign' of Parkinson's - a condition often associated with tremors.

Dehydration - Dr Paul Jarman, a consultant neurologist at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, told MailOnline: 'What I can say for sure is that it was not due to dehydration.' The NHS does not list shivering as a known symptom of dehydration - when the body loses more fluid than it takes in. 

Close-up footage showed the difficulty she was having trying to keep the quivering under control as she gripped her arms together.  

That second bout came 10 days after she blamed dehydration for the initial round of shakes she suffered during her earlier meeting with visiting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

During that incident an aide rushed to her side to offer her a glass of water, which she declined.  

A government official said that while Merkel attributed the first tremors on June 18 to drinking too little water and too much coffee on a hot day, the second episode was more a psychological issue as she tried desperately to avoid a repeat. 

Medics have speculated over what caused her to shake, with suggestions ranging from an over-active thyroid to low blood sugar.

Most doctors, however, are in agreement that the shaking is unlikely to have been caused by dehydration or Parkinson's disease. 

Peter Garrard, a professor of neurology at St George's, University of London, told MailOnline during the German Chancellor's first shaking episode that her symptoms 'seemed to fit' those of orthostatic tremor - a rare neurological condition that used to be known as 'Shaky Legs Syndrome'.

On June 27, after seeing the second footage of her trembling as she met Germany's President, Professor Garrard said orthostatic tremor is still the most likely cause.

Orthostatic tremors often cause people to tremble in one or more parts of their body. This is often worse when they stand, with many sufferers having tell-tale 'shaky' or 'frozen' legs. The problem tends to resolve when they walk, sit or lie down.

Stress can make the shakes worse, which then becomes a vicious cycle as tremors cause the patient to become increasingly uneasy. There is no denying Merkel has a stressful job, however, it is one she has held for 14 years. This led many to dismiss suggestions her shakes may be down to nerves or a panic attack.

The tremors, which can last just a few seconds, can also come on for no apparent reason. The rare disorder tends to strike people in their sixties.

Over time, the condition can cause fatigue, pain and immobility. While there is no cure, drugs like Clonazepam can ease the symptoms.

Walking aids like scooters, sticks or even wheelchairs in extreme cases, may eventually be required. However, only Merkel's arms and hands have been seen shaking to date.

GP Dr Sarah Brewer, a medical director of Healthspan, told MailOnline the shakes could have been brought on by anything from an over-active thyroid to side effects from medication. 

One practitioner, Dr Mike Fitzpatrick, said in the wake of her meeting with Zelenskiy that the shaking may be a symptom of an infection.

'Honestly, to me it looks like an infection,' Fitzpatrick said. 'Sometimes when you have an infection, you'll find the body will shake.' 

'I read that there'd been some mention of dehydration but I don't think it looks like that to me. You wouldn't normally get shaking like that with dehydration,' he added.

'If you were starving, maybe, but thirst wouldn't do that to you.'   

After the ceremony with Steinmeier, Merkel went on to the Bundestag lower house of parliament for the swearing-in of the new justice minister. She showed no signs of shaking and looked relaxed, chatting and laughing with Vice Chancellor Olaf Scholz. 

According to German newspaper Bild, Merkel, who turns 65 next week,  is always accompanied by a doctor and a paramedic from the Ministry of Health's health service when she flies to international summits.   

It is not publicly known if Mrs Merkel, who has led Germany since 2005, has any health problems.

German privacy laws are very strict on that type of information being published by the media.

There were brief concerns about her health in 2014 when she was taken ill during a television interview. The broadcast was interrupted when she experienced a drop in blood pressure.

Seibert explained at the time the leader did not feel well for a moment, then ate and drank something and continued the interview.

Merkel is frequently called the European Union's most influential leader and the most powerful woman in the world.

She has said she will leave politics at the end of her current term, in 2021.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky upon Zelensky's arrival at the Chancellery ten days ago

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky upon Zelensky's arrival at the Chancellery ten days ago

Merkel is renowned for her work ethic and has a reputation for outlasting other leaders at European Union summits with her ability to focus on the details of complex discussions deep into the night.

In the past, she has joked that she is a 'sleep camel' who can go days with just a few hours of sleep as long as she gets a full night of shut-eye at the weekend.

Merkel has loomed large on the European stage since 2005, helping guide the EU through the euro zone crisis and opening Germany's doors to migrants fleeing war in the Middle East in 2015 - a move that still divides the bloc and Germany.

Merkel began a stage-managed gradual exit from politics in October, when she said her fourth term as chancellor would be her last and that she would not seek re-election in 2021, when the next federal election is due.

In December, Merkel handed over the chair of her Christian Democratic Union (CDU) to her protege Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, though her unconvincing start in the role has set back the party's plans for a smooth leadership transition.

Source : https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7232263/Angela-Merkel-shakes-time-month-stands-alongside-Finlands-PM.html

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Video Shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel Shaking Uncontrollably In Public For The 2nd Time In A Few Days

Source:dailymail.co.uk

Video Shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel Shaking Uncontrollably In Public For The 2nd Time In A Few Days

Video Shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel Shaking Uncontrollably In Public For The 2nd Time In A Few Days

Source:dailymail.co.uk

Video Shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel Shaking Uncontrollably In Public For The 2nd Time In A Few Days